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Eve Investments says its Meluka and hemp honey will soon be available to US consumers

Tuesday, November 21, 2017 11:43:45 AM Australia/Melbourne

A Melaleuca (i.e tea-tree) honey produced in northern NSW should soon be available to US customers branded as Meluka honey.

And a hemp seed honey product may soon follow.

Perth based former uranium explorer – ASX listed Eve Investments announced last week (i.e. dated 9 November) that a subsidiary company it half-owns - Medic Honey has started marketing Meluka Honey into the US.

It said that the two Meluka honey products  “are currently being presented to potential customers.”

Both are based on the melaleuca alternifolia (i.e. tea-tree) bush which grows naturally in northern NSW.  One of the Meluka honeys, however is being marketed as a “ raw medicinal honey for topical use only.” 

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Capilano backs new Australian Manuka Honey Association

Tuesday, October 31, 2017 2:55:36 PM Australia/Melbourne

Capilano backs new Australian Manuka Honey Association

ASX Listed Capilano has been confirmed as one of the backers of the new Australian Manuka Honey Association (AMHA).

Other Australian honey companies, marketers, researchers and scientists are also involved in AMHA, which was formally incorporated as a public company limited earlier this month.

AMHA Chairman Paul Callander, from Western Australian plant-breeder,  ManukaLife  Pty Ltd, said that the new Association will oppose any moves by New Zealand honey interests to trademark the phrase Manuka honey.

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Manuka honey prices crash down-under

Monday, October 23, 2017 1:40:05 PM Australia/Melbourne

Australian retail prices for Manuka honey appear to have crashed in the second half of 2017.

They’re still high, and mostly higher than ordinary or normal honey. But prices for the special, ‘active’ Manuka honeys have tumbled dramatically.

New Zealand’s largest Manuka honey producer, the NZ Stock Exchange listed Comvita, is a good example.

Prices at its Australian online store were still at the old levels as this issue went to press. So a 250gms jar of its 20+ Manuka honey was still listed at $239.95, and the 15+ at some $129.95.

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New Zealand UMF Manuka honey producers – listing as at October 2017

Thursday, October 12, 2017 1:59:10 PM Australia/Melbourne

UMF Honey Association New Zealand UMF Manuka honey producers – listing as at October 2017

New Zealand’s Unique Manuka Factor (UMF) Honey Association has more than 100 members, and includes most of the big NZ honey producers.

This is a listing of the members, and web site links (where available).

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NZ attempt to trademark Manuka honey hits serious headwinds

Thursday, September 14, 2017 11:58:56 AM Australia/Melbourne

Leptospermum flowersAn attempt to trademark and restrict using the name Manuka honey to only New Zealand producers appears to have run into serious problems.

New Zealand’s Intellectual Property Office has reportedly rejected an application from the Unique Manuka Factor (UMF) Honey Association.

However the Association is said to be appealing the decision, and press reports suggest that the New Zealanders have also submitted trademark applications in Australia, the US, UK and perhaps even China.

The Australian application is reported to have lapsed, and those lodged in the other countries are understood to also still yet to get approval.

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Allergy concerns over milk proteins discovered in Chinese honey

Thursday, September 7, 2017 1:36:36 PM Australia/Melbourne

If you are allergic to dairy proteins such as casein, then you’d probably best avoid eating honey imported from China.diary cowThat’s because one of Europe’s leading technical laboratories has now confirmed multiple instances of Chinese honey containing milk proteins.
Just how and why honey should contain any level of milk proteins is a mystery. But experts are speculating that it may be a masking attempt by the Chinese manufacturers of fake and imitation honey.
Or in other words, the Chinese might be trying to fool the usual tests for fake and adulterated honey.
(The casein may also just be the result of sloppy and/or incompetent storage and handling processes.)
But, according to the German company, Intertek GmbH, there can now be no doubt that some Chinese honeys imported into Europe contain traces of milk proteins.

 

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Capilano reports Australian honey harvest was biggest for many years in winter 2017

Thursday, August 31, 2017 3:22:34 PM Australia/Melbourne

Australia had a bumper honey harvest in winter this year, and spring is already looking good as well.

Ben McKee, CEO of Australian Stock Exchange  listed honey packer - Capilano, said that it was the “largest ever winter honey supply for many, many years."

McKee made the remarks in a statement to the ASX announcing the company’s annual profit results earlier this month.

The results show that Capilano increased its market share in Australia, over the last 12 months even though overall sales were slightly down for the year.

The company also managed to increase net profits after tax, to just over $AUD 10million for the financial year 2016/2017.

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Official NZ Manuka honey standard delayed again

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 2:27:46 PM Australia/Melbourne

Finalization of the New Zealand Government’s proposed Manuka honey test has been deferred yet again.

A statement released by the government  earlier this month ( July 6th), said  it needs a further 6 to 8 weeks to properly evaluate 120 new submissions from industry and the public.

A  number of honey producers who used the new test were surprised to discover that their Manuka honey had failed, and would not be considered authentic, and/or government approved for export.

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A Consumers Guide to Creamed Honey

Wednesday, July 19, 2017 11:47:58 AM Australia/Melbourne

Many consumers prefer their honey creamed. Creamed honey is easier to handle, and when its done well, it has a melt-in-your mouth lusciousness.

But most consumers would be forgiven for being confused about what makes it different from normal honey. That’s not just because it has a lot of different names in the marketplace, including whipped honey, soft-set honey, pot-set honey.

Creamed honey also looks a lot like crystallized honey, sometimes called candied or granulated honey.

So this article tries to explain the difference.

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Aldi confirms its Mixed Blossom honey is mostly Chinese

Monday, May 1, 2017 3:02:46 PM Australia/Melbourne


It doesn’t say so on the label, but Aldi’s Mixed Blossom honey is mostly Chinese.

That’s what customer service told me today when I rang to enquire.

“Its 60% Chinese and 40% Australian” she said.

I rang customer service to ask about it because the labels don’t say where the honey comes from.

 But I was also confused about the difference between Aldi’s 375gms squeeze pack and its 1 kg tubs. The label on the 1 kg tubs says it has at least 30% Australian ingredients, but its 40% on the smaller 375gms squeeze pack.

“Is it different honey” I asked?

She said the information was the same for both – 60% Chinese and 40% Australian.

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